Specialists in African
and Caribbean Literature since 1966


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Books of the month


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When We Ruled

By Robin Walker

In twenty two chapters, When We Ruled examines the nature of what we call Black history; critically surveying the often-shoddy documentation of that history. Importantly, it focuses upon African civilization in the Valley of the Nile and analyzes the key historical phases of Ancient Egypt-critical exercises for any professed scholar of African history and vital pieces of Africa's legacy ... When we Ruled is a timely and immensely important work of benefit to scholars and students alike. I am proud to add it to my library,  from the Introduction--Runoko Rashidi.
 

Kechi's Hair Goes Every Which Way

By Tola Okogwu

Who will win in the epic battle between dad and hair? 
Kechi's hair is big, thick and loud ... and that's just the way she likes it. Mummy's away and it's up to Daddy to get Kechi and her hair ready for school. There's just one problem... he doesn't know how! 
Fun and hilarity ensue as Daddy tries to tame Kechi's swirly-springy, fluffy-puffy, squishy-squashy, candyfloss curls.

Come along with the children to New Beacon on the 19th May to hear Tola read her story and bring her characters to life. 

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Roots & Culture

By Eddie Chambers

How did a distinct and powerful Black British identity emerge? In the 1950s, when many Caribbean migrants came to Britain, there was no such recognised entity as "Black Britain." Yet by the 1980s, the cultural landscape had radically changed, and a remarkable array of creative practices such as theatre, poetry, literature, music and the visual arts gave voice to striking new articulations of Black-British identity. This new book chronicles the extraordinary blend of social, political and cultural influences from the mid-1950s to late 1970s that gave rise to new heights of Black-British artistic expression in the 1980s. Eddie Chambers relates how and why during these decades "West Indians" became "Afro-Caribbeans," and how in turn "Afro-Caribbeans" became "Black-British" - and the centrality of the arts to this important narrative.