Specialists in African
and Caribbean Literature since 1966


Books of the month


The Goddess of Mtwara and other stories

The Caine Prize for African Writing 2017

This collection brings together the five 2017 shortlisted stories, along with eleven stories written at the Caine Prize Writers' Workshop, which took place in Tanzania in April 2017. Judges are drawn from different literary fields including eminent journalists, broadcasters and academics with expertise and a connection to literature in Africa. Five stories are selected for the shortlist by the judges, with one being selected as the winner on the day of the award on 3 July 2017.

Baby goes to Market

By Atinuke & Angela Brooksbank

Join Baby and his mama at the bustling marketplace for a bright, bouncy read-aloud offering a gentle introduction to numbers.

Rhythmic language, visual humour and a bounty of delectable food make this a tale that is sure to whet little appetites for story time. When Baby and Mama go to market, baby is so adorable that the banana seller gives him six bananas. Baby eats one and puts five in the basket, but Mama doesn't notice. As Mama and Baby wind their way through the market stalls, cheeky Baby collects five juicy oranges, four sugary chin-chin biscuits, three roasted sweetcorn, two pieces of coconut ... until Mama notices that her basket is getting very heavy. Poor Baby, she thinks – he must be very hungry by now!

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The Chibok Girls

By Helon Habila

On 14th April 2014, 276 girls disappeared from a secondary school in northern Nigeria, kidnapped by the world's deadliest terror group. A tiny number have escaped back to their families but many remain missing. Reporting from inside the traumatised and blockaded community of Chibok, Helon Habila tracks down the survivors and the bereaved. Two years after the attack, he bears witness to their stories and to their grief. And moving from the personal to the political, he presents a comprehensive indictment of Boko Haram, tracing the circumstances of their ascent and the terrible fallout of their ongoing presence in Nigeria.