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Book Reading & Signing: Kechi's Hair Goes Every Which Way by Tola Okogwu

  • New Beacon Books 76 Stroud Green Road London, England, N4 3EN United Kingdom (map)

Meet The Little Girl Who Loves Her Beautiful Natural Afro Hair and Doesn't Care Who Knows it

‘Kechi’s Hair Goes Every Which Way’ tells the story of Kechi’s beautiful big hair and how her daddy has to make sure she gets ready in time for school.

 

’Mummy's away and it's up to Daddy to get Kechi and her hair ready for school. There's just one problem... he doesn’t know how! Fun and hilarity ensue as Daddy tries to tame Kechi's swirly-springy, fluffy-puffy, squishy-squashy, candyfloss curls.’

 

The 'Daddy Do My Hair?’ series was inspired by the relationship between author Tola Okogwu’s husband and daughter and is designed to challenge some of the perceptions and preconceptions around race, gender roles within parenting, bullying, friendships and relationships. These books have been an excellent way of encouraging diversity and inclusion from an early age – having children from all ethnicities enjoy the book makes an important impact on how children can identify with each other.

Bring the children along and join us for a read along with Tola Okogwu on Saturday 19th May at 1pm as we launch her third book. 

Tola's other titles include:

Daddy do my hair? Beth's Twists

Daddy do my hair? Hope's Braids

 

Tola holds a Bachelor’s degree in journalism and has written for several publications including Black Beauty and Hair Magazine and Metro UK. An avid reader, Tola enjoys spending time with her family and friends around her home in Kent where she lives with her husband and daughters.

Tola Okogwu is a British blogger and author of the ‘Daddy Do My Hair?’ book series for children. Launching her third book in the series ‘Kechi’s Hair Goes Every Which Way’ in May 2018, Tola wants to tackle the relationship between young black girls and their natural afro hair in a vibrant, entertaining and educational way.

“For me it starts with teaching the next generation that they are beautiful just the way they are. By showing them positive representations of people who look just like them in the media, in the books they read and toys they play with. We live in a world where black people are often only shown in a negative light and that includes our natural hair and skin colour. For black people, hair is so much more than just what grows out of our heads. Along with our skin colour, it’s the biggest signifier of the differences between us and other races and for the longest time we’ve been made to feel that there is something wrong and unattractive about it.” – Tola Okogwu


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